5.12, Whence Comfortable Oppression?

This particular puritanical libertarian finds himself constantly running into a kind of resistance to his efforts to expand liberty (property rights, voluntary production and trade) and all the fruits he is sure lie therein. He is no longer surprised to encounter otherwise thoughtful and sincere men who argue from the following always unstated but always …

5.9, Hoppe and justification

Note the following arguments in their succinctness: From John Stuart Mill (5.6): Liberty is necessary for development of the individual. IF one wants development, THEN one wants liberty. Of course the one who promotes coercive control by non-owners (government/thief) can simply reject the IF. He rarely does. He asserts that he can force development. He …

5.8, Isabel Paterson, Human Nature and Liberty

Isabel Paterson’s The God of the Machine is is one of those rich and mysterious works. It is at once singularly focused in subject-matter and expansive in historical breadth. In addition, there is an engineering metaphor running through the text that I have at best tapped but not entirely grasped. It is Paterson who highlighted, …

5.7, Spencer, Human Nature and Liberty

Murray Rothbard, the libertarian economist and revisionist historian, called Herbert Spencer’s Social Statics the greatest work of libertarian political philosophy ever written. It was for that reason that I read it. Such praise is worth investigation. What I found was the recesses of a spacious and patient thought on the nature of man and the …

5.4, Lineage and History, From Phoenicia to Hansa

We move, in thought and imagination, from the Mediterranean to the Baltic sea. Interesting that the great flourishing of the contracting and trading spirit, the “yes” and “no” of promise, the voluntary mutually beneficial meeting, has taken place in the development of instruments that carried the embodied spirit away from the gaze and control of …

5.2, Analogy and Coercion

The thesis for the “5” series of posts is to meditate on coercion, its prevalence, its unjustifiability, the costs (which may be split between the coercer and the coerced), the value of liberty, the foundation of liberty in property rights, and the reasonability of the anarcho-capitalist framework. We will inch our way into this. But …

Socrates and the rule of liberty

In one of my favorite Platonic dialogues, The Crito, Socrates is represented at the end of his life, in prison, awaiting execution. It is quite a setting. Crito, loyal follower (loyal in affection but not loyal if loyalty is best for wisdom), arrives to visit with Socrates and persuade him to break the law by …

The Puritanical Libertarian

Why all the vacillation, here at Puritanical Libertarianism, between the moral–talk of virtue, righteousness, purity (cleanliness), and the economic–trade, profit, loss, wealth? Because, the Puritanical Libertarian asserts the unity of reality and thinks he sees the same in the two spheres. It does not mean that he thinks the two spheres of equal weight. The …

Spencer on democracy and moral development

From Social Statics: “Political freedom, therefore, is, as we say, an external result of an internal sentiment-is alike, in origin, practicability, and permanence, dependent on the moral sense, and it is only when this is supreme in its influence that so high a form of social organization as a democracy can be maintained.” First, Spencer …

Abortion and Welfare

The critical value for a woman’s legal right (I do not say moral) to an abortion is the right to be left alone. She demands privacy about who she attaches herself to and the right to relinquish relations when she wants. The argument that she is merely messing with her own body is nonsense and …