6.7, Right of Disassociation as Test for Liberty

We approach the crux of the matter. We approach the ultimate test for verification of property rights wherein lies the ultimate test for liberty and all of its fruits. The fruits? Social harmony, health, civilization, cooperation, family, wealth, virtue. How can I be so sure and so offensively brief? Out of the following: all of …

6.5, Disassociation and Fear of -isms.

I have loosely tied the right to be racist or sexist in attitudes (not in attack or aggression) with reflections on four maybe-sages (Laotzu, Buddha, Socrates, Jesus). This right to be racist or sexist (or any other -ist one wants to add) is a part of the right to associate and disassociate. Often the reaction …

6.4, Jesus, Disassociation and Living Well

Jesus chose to disassociate from much of the social (and so political) standards of his day. He repeatedly frustrated the Pharisees and Sadducees with the way in which he ignored the nuances of their rules and regulations. Jesus might engage in what counted as work on the sabbath. Jesus might spend time with the discriminated …

6.3, Socrates, Disassociation and Wisdom

Socrates, in his jail cell discoursing with Crito, dismisses as mere warm feelings Crito’s multi-pronged attempt at argumentation that Socrates should break the law and escape into exile. Socrates reminds Crito, as if Crito had forgotten (Crito had not forgotten since Crito himself judges at the beginning of the dialogue what Socrates reminds him of …

6.2_Laotzu, Disassociation and Sage Status

Laotzu recommends not-striving. In fact, he recommends the achievement of non-action. The paradoxical language of Laotzu captured by achieving (an action if there were one) non-action invites the reader to look beyond a literalist fundamentalism. But like Buddha and the recommendation to cease craving, Laotzu employs the rhetoric of disassociation when characterizing the way. Let …