5.16, On Theoretical Sorrow and Recent News

This puritanical libertarian finds reason for sorrow all around. Sorrow can lead to despair or, as the sage Jesus recommends in his beatitudes, sorrow(blessed are the mourners) can lead to submission to what is right (blessed are the meek). Libertarians are not known for their attention to meekness, but submission to nonaggression and voluntary contract …

5.15, Disassociation or Defense

I have made much of the right to use self-defense. All the while I have wondered if my words could be misused by he who would rationalize evil by my words. I would like to state plainly when violence may be employed (defense) and when it may not be employed but disassociation may be. Disassociation …

5.14, The Lie Continued

This puritanical libertarian operates under the following presuppositions: first, virtue is best. Second, liberty is a presupposition of virtue. I will argue for neither. Take them or leave them. From those points I examine the words of the sages and the moral judgments handed down. Hammurabi's Code and the later Hebrew Ten Commandments prohibit "bearing …

5.13, The Lie

**The following analysis is made for understanding only. Action requires much more consideration. I do not recommend the lie. But I can recommend its analysis. What has been traditionally condemned in every decent society, and even among rogues and criminals when they are in league with each other is the principle that lying is wrong. …

5.12, Whence Comfortable Oppression?

This particular puritanical libertarian finds himself constantly running into a kind of resistance to his efforts to expand liberty (property rights, voluntary production and trade) and all the fruits he is sure lie therein. He is no longer surprised to encounter otherwise thoughtful and sincere men who argue from the following always unstated but always …

5.11, Living in Comfortable Oppression

Oppression comes in degrees or amounts. One finds oneself involuntarily committed to one degree or another. That the human animal revolts at involuntary commitment is not even worth evidence. The beneficiaries of course do not revolt. They grovel. In the recently prior posts we have looked at a few considerations about the relationship between development, …

5.10, Hoppe and Justification Cont’d.

In 5.9 I presented a version of Hoppe's profoundly intuitive and unassailable argument for private property rights. But it was limited to the private property right to the body. Today we extend that to other things outside the body. Private property rights are the foundation of liberty. In 5.6-5.8 I showed how Herbert Spencer, John …

5.9, Hoppe and justification

Note the following arguments in their succinctness: From John Stuart Mill (5.6): Liberty is necessary for development of the individual. IF one wants development, THEN one wants liberty. Of course the one who promotes coercive control by non-owners (government/thief) can simply reject the IF. He rarely does. He asserts that he can force development. He …

5.8, Isabel Paterson, Human Nature and Liberty

Isabel Paterson's The God of the Machine is is one of those rich and mysterious works. It is at once singularly focused in subject-matter and expansive in historical breadth. In addition, there is an engineering metaphor running through the text that I have at best tapped but not entirely grasped. It is Paterson who highlighted, …

5.7, Spencer, Human Nature and Liberty

Murray Rothbard, the libertarian economist and revisionist historian, called Herbert Spencer's Social Statics the greatest work of libertarian political philosophy ever written. It was for that reason that I read it. Such praise is worth investigation. What I found was the recesses of a spacious and patient thought on the nature of man and the …